common fonts for all web browsers

August 4, 2007

A handy little list of the common fonts, MAC and PC equivalents, as well as how they render in various browsers.

http://www.ampsoft.net/webdesign-l/WindowsMacFonts.html

Advertisements

Functionality tester for websites

February 5, 2007

okay, this is a very handy little tool for web editors… It tests functional units of a website (navigation, title, etc.) per best practices.

http://fae.cita.uiuc.edu/


CMS for bloggers

September 19, 2006

So, I’m still investigating a CMS (Content Management System) for the libraries web editors. A CMS is just a easy way to get content onto the web, without having to do much in the way of design. Blogger in some senses is a very primitive (primitive because it is limited in what it can do) CMS. Unfortunately, my quick and informal survey of web editors has yielded, ummm… not much. A lot of them still seem to use Dreamweaver and templates (our current setup), a few Contribute, and then every thing in the middle, including (shudder) FrontPage.

As for myself, I am in a similiar situation. It’s time to either renew my license with ee or skip on to something else. sigh.
I want something easy to use (ee is!) with a photo gallery (ee has but I’m not using it for a variety of reasons) and something that is not so expensive for a small commerical license. I’m currently operating under the personal license but it is definitely restrictive in terms of what I can do. So.
I want one thing to do everything. That would sound like a cms, no? One design software that I can control with css, that supports flexibility (alot of it) in terms of templating.

Here’s some interesting research:
searching for the perfect photo/gallery software

an article about mambo vs. drupal

Here is what I’ve tried and used so far with a brief review of features:

Expression Engine (now also a free version ‘Core’ for personal sites):
Supports:
Categories & Subcategories
Photo Gallery builtin
Templating via CSS
blacklisting

Requires:
php
and some knowledge of CSS

199$ for personal, noncommercial with annual fee of 19.95$
Drawbacks: Cost and limitations for what constitutes personal use
Plus: Excellent tech support

Movable Type (I used the free version, before all of the changes to a more commerical product)

Supports:
Categories & Subcategories
Templating via CSS

Requires:
perl
and some knowledge of CSS

Cost: not sure now
Drawbacks: slow at times and very prone to spam

Greymatter
Supports:
Categories & Subcategories
Templating via CSS

Requires:
perl
and some knowledge of CSS

Cost: free, no longer supported?

Blogger
Free, no installation needed
Supports CSS
No categories, very little customization, not much support for images