Semantic Search engine?

June 28, 2008

From Read/WriteWeb:

Evri Beta Launches: Search Less – Understand More

evri-logo.pngEvri, a Paul Allen backed semantic search engine, launched into a limited beta this week. Evri was first shown publicly at the D6 conference. Evri’s CEO Neil Roseman likes to talk about Evri in terms of organizing content instead of calling it a search engine. At its core, however, Evri definitely is a search engine, though it adds a very sophisticated semantic layer on top of its results that emphasizes the relationships between different search terms.

—————
Hmm? Believe the hype? I’ve requested an invite to the beta testing, so I’ll share my thoughts soon, I hope.

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new things for 2008… crystal ball gazing with opensource, social networking, digital identity, and more aka the predictions.

December 31, 2007

I was poking around trying to find a better video editor, when I stumbled across an opensource project called, Jahshaka. Jahshaka is positioning itself as being a fullbodied product that can compete with such software as finalcut pro (wow!). Not sure about that, because I could never (ever, ever) get the windows installer to work properly. Maybe if I had already switched to ubuntu ALREADY…

Anyhow, I started thinking about all of the new things out there that I probably don’t know about (and some that I do) and somehow I ended up crystal ball gazing (a very dangerous occupation).

It is really amazing how fullbodied some of the opensource products are (openoffice, wordpress, drupal, anyone?) and perhaps, even more amazing, all of the online tools now available (thinkfree, etc.)

As for my thoughts on the near future on the ‘net: niche social networking, user centered aggregated content (perhaps, even some consolidation?), and digital identity. Web3.0 and semantic web? Maybe.

I think niche social networking will become even more popular (social networking sites tailored to the needs of visual artists have popped up recently). Considering how easy it is to get lost in the crowd at facebook or myspace, I can see how appealing a specialized site is. Plus, the one size fits all just does not really… well, fit. Visual artists have been advocating/begging/petitioning myspace for years to create a visual arts portal, as myspace has for musicians. Why bother with that, when there are several sites specifically for visual artists?

However, having a specialized site means another profile and spot on the web to maintain. Social networking and content aggregators are surely to be even stronger in ’08. How else to manage all of the personal content bits floating out on the web? All of the stuff you want to read? Google reader can help, Pageflakes might be even be more useful (a variety of content, not just feeds or clipped websites), but then there is the other stuff: all of the various profiles, with logins and passwords. Social networking aggregators such as spokeo, profilactic and others, can be handy. Digital identity tools are certainly helpful, for logging in OpenID (one login for multiple sites) and in distinguishing what is yours and perhaps, more importantly, what is NOT yours (and is in no way affiliated.) Consolidation is bound to happen and a little is a good thing — unless google ends up owning EVERYTHING….

Among sites being touted as ‘hot’ for ’08: PowerSearch (a semantic search engine) , Pownce (social networking & more), etsy (an online store similar to ebay focused on handmade and originally produced products… most of the art community that I know, do not seem overly enamored with etsy, thus far), Dopplr.com (a travel & meetup site), twitter (really? I thought we were all tired of twitter by now), children’s social networking such as moshimonsters and webkinz (if you know a tween or preteen, just ask them about webkinz), seesmic (video diaries)…

..and of course, Google opensocial, if it ever makes headway. I also like some of the projects which allow users to make a positive contribution to a body of knowledge in some way, like the steve museum project, where users assign keywords/tag artwork, identifying artists’ work, and more) and also recaptcha, which uses scanned images from books as captchas (a phrase or word typed in some sort of form, that the user must enter in a text box, which prevent spambots from automatically using the form).

..and then there is always wikipedia, citizendium, the new Google Knol, and those sorts of sites.

Other trends & technologies that have popped up in the onslaught of 2008 predictions posts/articles include:

Location based services (niche marketing of a sort), Mobile Social Networking (I keep reading about this as a big trend, but it just seems more like a means of access to me — be it a pda, iphone, laptop, desktop, psp or whatever… but freely available WIFI at most public buildings, that could definitely continue to change things), lots of chatter about Google taking on the cellphone/mobile industry with Android, Gaming, SecondLife/Virtual Worlds (OpenSL?), internet habits changing as the mobile industry & high demand downloads continue to increase, increase in usage of Linux and other opensource projects (evergreen, the opensource ILS?), and an increase in distrust in google (I love google products, but they are a corporation after all.)

Creating widgets and apps to work with much of this technology is usually (but not always, of course) fairly easy to do and can easily be done by someone with minimal coding experience. I see lots of places where libraries can be, if they want to be. I guess that is the question.

Facebook is so last year http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2007/dec/24/facebook.socialnetworking

2008 Predictions http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/2008_web_predictions.php

2008 Technology predictions http://latestgeeknews.blogspot.com/2007/12/2008-technology-prediction.html

The Economists Prediction for 2008 http://www.economist.com/science/displaystory.cfm?story_id=10410912

Top 10 Startups Worth Watching in 2008 http://www.wired.com/techbiz/startups/news/2007/12/YE_10_startups

30 Library Technology Predictions http://stephenslighthouse.sirsidynix.com/archives/2007/12/30_library_tech.html

..and of course, a generous sprinkling of my thoughts.


new things for ’08… crystal ball gazing with opensource, social networking, digital identity, and more.

December 31, 2007

I was poking around trying to find a better video editor, when I stumbled across an opensource project called, Jahshaka. Jahshaka is positioning itself as being a fullbodied product that can compete with such software as finalcut pro (wow!). Not sure about that, because I could never (ever, ever) get the windows installer to work properly. Maybe if I had already switched to ubuntu ALREADY…

Anyhow, I started thinking about all of the new things out there that I probably don’t know about (and some that I do) and somehow I ended up crystal ball gazing (a very dangerous occupation).

It is really amazing how fullbodied some of the opensource products are (openoffice, wordpress, drupal, anyone?)  and perhaps, even more amazing, all of the online tools now available (thinkfree, etc.)

As for my thoughts on the near future on the ‘net: niche social networking, user centered aggregated content (perhaps, even some consolidation?), and digital identity.  Web3.0 and semantic web? Maybe.

I think niche social networking will become even more popular (social networking sites tailored to the needs of visual artists have popped up recently). Considering how easy it is to get lost in the crowd at facebook or myspace, I can see how appealing a specialized site is. Plus, the one size fits all just does not really… well, fit. Visual artists have been advocating/begging/petitioning myspace for years to create a visual arts portal, as myspace has for musicians. Why bother with that, when there are several sites specifically for visual artists?

However, having a specialized site means another profile and spot on the web to maintain. Social networking and content aggregators are surely to be even stronger in ’08. How else to manage all of the personal content bits floating out on the web? All of the stuff you want to read? Google reader can help, Pageflakes might be even be more useful (a variety of content, not just feeds or clipped websites), but then there is the other stuff: all of the various profiles, with logins and passwords. Social networking aggregators such as spokeo, profilactic and others, can be handy. Digital identity tools are certainly helpful, for logging in OpenID (one login for multiple sites) and in distinguishing what is yours and perhaps, more importantly, what is NOT yours (and is in no way affiliated.) Consolidation is bound to happen and a little is a good thing — unless google ends up owning EVERYTHING….

Among sites being touted as ‘hot’ for ’08: PowerSearch (a semantic search engine) , Pownce (social networking & more), etsy (an online store similar to ebay focused on handmade and originally produced products… most of the art community that I know, do not seem overly enamored with etsy, thus far), Dopplr.com (a travel & meetup site), twitter (really? I thought we were all tired of twitter by now), children’s social networking such as moshimonsters and webkinz (if you know a tween or preteen, just ask them about webkinz), seesmic (video diaries)…

..and of course, Google opensocial, if it ever makes headway. I also like some of the projects which allow users to make a positive contribution to a body of knowledge in some way, like the steve museum project, where users assign keywords/tag artwork,  identifying artists’ work, and more) and also recaptcha, which uses scanned images from books as captchas (a phrase or word typed in some sort of form, that the user must enter in a text box, which prevent spambots from automatically using the form).

..and then there is always wikipedia, citizendium, the new Google Knol, and those sorts of sites.

Other trends & technologies that have popped up in the onslaught of 2008 predictions posts/articles include:

Location based services (niche marketing of a sort), Mobile Social Networking (I don’t really see so much as a trend, just a means of access whether a pda,  iphone laptop, or psp or whatever… but freely available WIFI at most public buildings, that could definitely continue to change things), lots of chatter about Google taking on the cellphone/mobile industry with Android, Gaming, SecondLife/Virtual Worlds (OpenSL?), internet habits changing as the mobile industry & high demand downloads continue to increase, increase in usage of Linux and other opensource projects (evergreen, the opensource ILS?), and an increase in distrust in google (I love google products, but they are a corporation after all.)

Creating widgets and apps to work with much of this technology is usually (but not always, of course) fairly easy to do and can easily be done by someone with minimal coding experience. I see lots of places where libraries can be, if they want to be. I guess that is the question.

Facebook is so last year http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2007/dec/24/facebook.socialnetworking

2008 Predictions http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/2008_web_predictions.php

2008 Technology predictions               http://latestgeeknews.blogspot.com/2007/12/2008-technology-prediction.html

The Economists Prediction for 2008                            http://www.economist.com/science/displaystory.cfm?story_id=10410912

Top 10 Startups Worth Watching in 2008 http://www.wired.com/techbiz/startups/news/2007/12/YE_10_startups

30 Library Technology Predictions http://stephenslighthouse.sirsidynix.com/archives/2007/12/30_library_tech.html

..and of course, a generous sprinkling of my thoughts.


a little news on freebase

September 3, 2007

While freebase.org is still developer only (are these related? a little hard to tell, but I think yes) freebase.com is now open, no invitation needed.

So, there. Go play in a new sandbox! ;-D


Mini presentation on Web 2.0 technologies

August 21, 2007

Overview

 

 

  • Looking to the future

    • Higher profile web presence

    • Being where our users are

      • Facebook

      • Comments in blog

      • PennTags – tagging by users in the catalog

      • Flickr?


    • Web 3.0/Semantic Web


A quick intro to social bookmarking

Social bookmarking is an activity performed over a computer network that allows users to save and categorize (see folksonomy) a personal collection of bookmarks and share them with others. Users may also take bookmarks saved by others and add them to their own collection, as well as to subscribe to the lists of others. – a personal knowledge management tool …

The concept of shared online bookmarks dates back to April 1996 with the launch of itList.com. Within the next three years online bookmark services became competitive, with venture-backed companies like Backflip, Blink,Clip2, Hotlinks, Quiver, and others entering the market. Lacking viable models for making money, most of this early generation of social bookmarking companies failed as the dot-com bubble burst.
— Wikipedia, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_bookmarking, (2007)

The main features of any social bookmarking tool are

  • centralized storage and availability of web links (i.e., accessible from most any computer with internet connection)

  • the ability to organize web links in some way (tagging, categorizing, bundling, descriptions, etc.)

  • ease of use (little or no coding experience needed)

  • discovery (e.g., the ability to share, recommend, or discover web links from other users)


A few popular social bookmarking tools include:

CiteULike (http://www.citeulike.org/ ) saves citation details, exports them in a few different formats, and aggregates journal articles. Sometimes called the “del.icio.us for the academic world”.

 


del.icio.us (
http://del.icio.us ) is a social bookmarking tool that allows users to save, recommend, and share bookmarks through networks. Users can bundle (categorize) web links as well as assign tags (keywords). Links can be publicly shared or private. A GIL record can be tagged in del.icio.us.


Digg (
http://digg.com/) is similar to both del.icio.us and pageflakes in that it is social bookmarking. Digg provides categories as a controlled entry point and allows users to rate articles.


furl
(http://furl.net) is a social bookmarking site website that allows users to store searchable copies of websites; additionally users can share their website copies.

PennTags (http://tags.library.upenn.edu /) is social bookmarking for the University of Pennsylvania’s catalog. An example of a record tagged in PennTags catalog (a Voyager catalog!)

Pines/Evergreen is anticipating tagging as a Fall 2007 enhancement; OCLC’s Worldcat.org also has social bookmarking on their list of future enhancements.

StumbleUpon (http://www.stumbleupon.com/ ) is a toolbar feature which allows for user recommendations and metadata entry (descriptions, etc.), and random discovery.

..and expanding beyond bookmarking…

Nines (http://www.nines.org/index.html ) uses Collex “a collections and exhibits tool for the remixable web, to aggregate peer-reviewed online scholarship and allow you to collect, annotate, and share it with students and colleagues” and have partnered with libraries such as University of Virginia.


Pageflakes (http://www.pageflakes.com/) is an ajax driven site that allows a user to pull in and share multiple kinds of rss feeds and web sites including del.icio.us links, news sites, blogs, and more. pageflakes is actively developing its service to give users more features and greater functionality without sacrificing ease of use. To see a pageflake pulling in UGA’s library content: http://www.pageflakes.com/georgiawebgurl/

Netvibe (
http://www.netvibes.com ) is an ajax driven site that allows a user to pull in and share multiple kinds of rss feeds including del.icio.us links, news sites, blogs, and more. netvibes was a little earlier than pageflakes in development.

LibraryThing (http://www.librarything.com ) is a organizational service for materials such as personal libraries which provides means to organize, share, and discover resources. LibraryThing has recently developed widgets for use by libraries. Two academic libraries are testing.

SmartTech (http://smartech.gatech.edu /): Georgia Tech’s institutional repository which includes user submitted content.


…and other social networking sites which are offer more expanded services


Academic Libraries using Social Bookmarking:


Griffin Tech
http://del.icio.us/griffintechlibrary/

University of Michigan

http://www.lib.umich.edu/usability/resources.html


University of Tennessee
http://www.lib.utc.edu/interesting-websites.html

University of Georgia Cataloging Department

http://www.libs.uga.edu/catalog/links.html


Savannah Technical College
http://del.icio.us/savannahtech

..and there’s even a Library community devoted to academic libraries using web 2.0 technologies:
http://library20.ning.com/group/academiclibariesandlibrary20web20

A few resources about social bookmarking/networking and other web 2.0 tools:

31 things to do with flickr in a library

http://www.webjunction.org/do/DisplayContent?id=17624

 

The Academic Library 2.0 (a graphic)

http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=222280353&size=o

 

Academic libraries who are blogging (a list)

http://www.blogwithoutalibrary.net/links/index.php?title=Academic_libraries

 

Chief Thingamabrian [LibraryThing overview]

http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6403633.html

 

 

Five weeks to a Social Library [resources and courses]

http://www.sociallibraries.com/course/

 

Friends: Social Networking Sites for Engaged Library Services

http://onlinesocialnetworks.blogspot.com/

 

Library Thing: Sneak Peek LibraryThing for libraries

http://www.librarything.com/thingology/2007/04/sneak-peek-librarything-for-libraries_09.php


Social Bookmarking Tools 1: General Reviews
D-Lib Magazine, April 2005, Vol. 11 No.4
http://www.dlib.org/dlib/april05/hammond/04hammond.html


Tagging in the Medical Library

http://tunaiskewl.wordpress.com/2007/07/08/tagging-in-the-medical-library/

 

Why and how to use blogging to promote your library’s services

Infotoday, Nov/Dec 2003, Vol. 17 No. 6

http://www.infotoday.com/MLS/nov03/fichter.shtml

 


Learn more about social networking tools via video:


The machine is us/ing Us (Very good and very short introduction to what is web 2.0)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gmP4nk0EOE

 

RSS Feeds in Plain English

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0klgLsSxGsU

 

Wikis in Plain English

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dnL00TdmLY

 

Using del.icio.us

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1pOsYjCvE8

 

To the future:

Web 3.0/semantic web

The semantic web is an evolving extension of the World Wide Web in which web content can be expressed not only in natural language, but also in a format that can be read and used by software agents, thus permitting them to find, share and integrate information more easily.[1] It derives from W3C director Sir Tim Berners-Lee‘s vision of the Web as a universal medium for data, information, and knowledge exchange. At its core, the semantic web comprises a philosophy,[2] a set of design principles,[3] collaborative working groups, and a variety of enabling technologies.

–Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_web

So, if Web2.0 is about collaboration, ease of use (on the user side) then Web 3.0 is about taking information and the efforts of the Web 2.0 collaboration and using technology to extend possibilities.

Semantic web technologies(?)

Freebase (http://www.freebase.org ) is a collaborative site (i.e., social networking) which also uses metadata to assist in organizing content.

Mashups?

A Mashup is a web application which pulls together information using a variety of resources to produce a singular thing (movie, webpage, etc.).

more

Getting started with del.icio.us

http://del.icio.us/help/

delicious page for links in this presentation

http://del.icio.us/webtechnologiespresentation

Image by sirexkat (Kathryn Greene) licensed under creative commons attribution 2.0 (flickr)

Thanks to Melissa Rethlefsen (Learning Resource Center) Mayo Clinic for sharing her list of library del.icio.us links.


while I wait for freebase…

July 13, 2007

okay, I think the name is a little odd (? isn’t it?), but freebase.com looks kind of cool but who knows because I don’t have an ACCOUNT yet.

If you have an extra invite, could you slide one over this way? 😉

http://www.freebase.com

thanks!
georgiawebgurl@gmail.com