Open Identity Exchange project

March 3, 2010

Interesting article about a potential project involving google, paypal, verizon and others.

“Open Identity Exchange (OIX) is a newly founded non-profit organization, launched today at the RSA Conference 2010 by Google, PayPal, Equifax, VeriSign, Verizon, CA and Booz Allen Hamilton. The aim of this new organization is exchange of online identity credentials across public and private sectors; in other words, it can certify online identity providers to U.S. federal standards.”

http://mashable.com/2010/03/03/google-paypal-oix/

Hmm… Google, Paypal, and Verizon?

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Question of the Day: How to search your own tweets at twitter

February 24, 2010

So, this was MY question today: as in, I wanted to re-post a tweet about moonshine arts & literary magazine. I couldn’t quite remember what I wrote and I didn’t use a #hashtag. So what to do? How do you search your own twitter feed? There are lots of cool trending tools out there, but those are very limited in terms of timeframe. I personally like trendtastic.

Per my usual M.O. I tweeted, buzzed, & facebook’d my request –even before I google’d, now what does that tell ya? I tell you what it tells me — I trust my networks of techies, artists, photographers, librarians, metadata mavens, programmers, hackers, writers, proj managers DIVAS — the creme de cool , more than google for quick answers.

Here is what I tried BEFORE I tweeted my plea for help:

None of these achieved any results. Strange, no? Not even the advanced search feature was successful. I know that I can scroll back chronologically through my posts but that is a LOT of work.

Doesn’t this seem like a huge failure on twitter’s part? Surely there are times when people what to see something from a previous week or month…and how will that fit into the semantic web? If the semantic web is all about the data and finding relevant info, whoa… huge hole.

One answer
My friend and webgurl, Amy, tweeted back almost instantly:

set up an RSS feed for own tweets & search in Thunderbird.

Looking at it from the RSS angle, I pulled my twitter feed into google reader, but that pretty pretty much starts with today, so didn’t help me find my moonshine arts tweet. I did find it using advanced search using friendfeed (yeah, I have an account there, too!), so big kudos to them. Good luck if you ever want to find anything in twitter or facebook. It’s nearly impossible — perhaps, this is where google buzz will score its biggest hit.
…and if I’m wrong and there is an easier way to do this, by ALL means, please let me know — because I’m not the only one who wants to see what they have tweeted.


spam, spam, spam @ google groups

February 3, 2010

So, I’m the admin for like 5 different google groups. I’ve set the groups to moderation for new members and membership has to be approved. Still, still, we are getting hit with spam. Finally, as a desperate last measure, I’ve closed the list down for reading, unless you are logged in. I kind of wanted to keep the list open for reading, but oh well…

I discovered that google groups is being hit with spam and there has even been some chatter on the ‘net that google is slowly dumping google groups. I don’t know that to be true, but there’s the ‘net gossip and the Jquery list dumped google groups back in October.
http://www.webmonkey.com/blog/Google_Groups_Fail:_JQuery_Dumps_Google_Over_Spam__Interface_Problems


Google the year in review & the future

January 1, 2010

In 2009 the web as we knew it changed dramatically. Twitter graduated to become a media darling and a mainstream communication staple. Facebook became the most significant social network of this day and age. And Google changed the way we search.

Lots of reflection on google including gmail, google apps, chrome & android/mobile.

To the future:
google wave(?)

more at mashable


Google Policy Fellowship for Librarians

December 11, 2009

Apply for 2010 Google Policy Fellowship with ALA Washington Office

The ALA Washington Office will be participating in the Google Policy Fellowship program for the summer of 2010. Google Policy Fellows work for ten weeks during the summer at ALA Washington or at other public interest organizations involved in debates on broadband and access policy, copyright reform, online privacy, and open government. In particular, ALA encourages master’s and doctoral students in library and information studies with an interest in national public policy to apply for this fellowship.

This year’s host organizations include: American Library Association, Cato Institute, Center for Democracy and Technology, Competitive Enterprise Institute, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Internet Education Foundation, Media Access Project, New America Foundation, Public Knowledge, Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, The Citizen Lab, Creative Commons, Future of Music Coalition, Progress and Freedom Foundation, Technology Policy Institute. Host organizations new in 2010 are The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies and National Hispanic Media Coalition.

Check out the Google Policy Fellow website for pertinent details.

Applications are due Monday, December 28, 2009.


How many people on the ‘net doing what?

December 3, 2009

I’m always leery of statistics as I have a hard time believing they are ever accurate… but whoa is this kind of cool:

You can read more about it here, including where the numbers come from.