Who owns the digital version of books?

December 17, 2009

Interesting article about licensing of older works (print) and ownership…

But the question of exactly who owns the electronic rights to such older titles is in dispute, making it a rising source of conflict in one of the publishing industry’s last remaining areas of growth.

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Call for papers (Intellectual Property conference)

December 14, 2009

Call for papers: Conference on Intellectual Property, Iona College, New Rochelle, NY

April 30-May 1, 2010; (cfp deadline: Feb. 5, 2010)

Iona College announces the Second Conference on Intellectual Property to be held at Iona College in New Rochelle, NY, April 30 – May 1, 2010. The keynote address will be presented by James Boyle.*

In our second year, the Conference on Intellectual Property will continue to explore intellectual property in a cross-disciplinary context. What is it, how has it evolved as a concept, and in what ways do we feel its practical and theoretical impact upon academic, economic, legal and technological fields? From plagiarism, to patent law, to the Creative Commons and beyond, the conference is sure to offer a remarkable breadth and depth of insights and approaches to what may well be the defining issue of our time. Come join the conversation!

Selected essays will be published in a proposed collection for a peer-reviewed press.

500-word Papers/Panel abstracts or complete papers should be submitted by February 5th, 2010 to Shannon Donlon at sdonlon@iona.edu. Questions can be directed to Dr. Amy Stackhouse at: astackhouse@iona.edu.

2010 Conference Information will soon be available at: www.iona.edu/cip

*James Boyle is William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law at Duke Law School and co-founder of the Center for the Study of the Public Domain. He is the author of The Public Domain: Enclosing the Commons of the Mind and Shamans, Software and Spleens: Law and the Construction of the Information Society. He writes widely on issues of intellectual property, internet regulation and legal theory. He was one of the founding board members of Creative Commons (www.creativecommons.org), which works to facilitate the free availability of art, scholarship, and cultural materials by developing innovative, machine-readable licenses that individuals and institutions can attach to their work. He served as a board member from 2002 until 2009, the last year as Chairman of the board. He was also a co-founder of Science Commons (www.sciencecommons.org), which aims to expand the Creative Commons mission into the realm of scientific and technical data, and of ccLearn (learn.creativecommons.org), which works to promote the development and use of open educational resources. Professor Boyle is also a member of the academic advisory boards of the Electronic Privacy and Information Center (www.epic.org), the Connexions (cnx.rice.edu) open-source courseware project, and of Public Knowledge (www.publicknowledge.org). In addition, he continues to write an online column for the Financial Times‘ New Economy Policy Forum (news.ft.com/comment/columnists/neweconomy).


Orphan Works (unclear copyright)

October 3, 2009

http://www.archivists.org/standards/OWBP-V4.pdf

From the introduction:
“‘Orphan works’ is a term used to describe the situation in which the owner of a copyrighted work cannot be identified and located by someone who wishes to make use of the work in a manner that requires permission of the copyright owner. Proposed orphan works legislation, such as the Orphan Works Act of 2008 (H.R. 5889) and the Shawn Bentley Orphan Works Act of 2008 (S.2913), would reduce penalties for infringement if an infringer ‘undertakes a diligent effort to locate the owner of the infringed copyright.’ This statement describes what professional archivists consider to be best practices regarding reasonable efforts to identify and locate rights holders. It is based on the authors’ knowledge of the kinds of materials that are likely to qualify as orphan works and on their professional experience in trying to obtain rights information for such works in the past.”


medical illustrations and photos free for use

March 16, 2009

Interesting that they have chosen flickr… so these could definitely be used for art purposes. These are remixable (collage! digital mashup! video!) and shareable by attribution (if I’m reading the cc correctly).

“An incredible archive of US Army medical photos and illustrations is being made available free under a Creative Commons Attribution license on Flickr by the National Museum of Health and Medicine:

This previously unreported archive at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Washington, D.C., contains 500,000 scans of unique images so far, with another 225,000 set to be digitized this year.”


http://www.flickr.com/photos/medicalmuseum/

..and here’s the boingboing article about it.


Copyright, RSS, & more

July 18, 2008

Apparently today is copyright day…

Given that I use RSS feeds to pull my content into other sites (facebook, my portfolio, etc.), I sometimes get caught up in the ease of use and forget that RSS is a really a form of syndication.

Hmm… today I came across this interesting post via my google reader: a brief discussion of some of the issues surrounding copyright and RSS.

So, if I don’t allow sharing of my images in my image gallery, but then I crosspost them via RSS, I should probably make sure I have a copyright statement in the feed, too(?) I do allow some selected image usage licensed under creative commons for some of my work at flickr (images which do not live in my image gallery). Sigh, it’s all very complicated.

On the other hand (and in another mailbox), I received a link to the nifty copyright slider, i.e., a online tool to check the potential copyright clearance needed…and really, if you are still confused about creative commons, may I suggest this (again):


Copyright, RSS, & more

July 18, 2008

Apparently today is copyright day…

Given that I use RSS feeds to pull my content into other sites (facebook, my portfolio, etc.), I sometimes get caught up in the ease of use and forget that RSS is a really a form of syndication.

Hmm… today I came across this interesting post via my google reader: a brief discussion of some of the issues surrounding copyright and RSS.

So, if I don’t allow sharing of my images in my image gallery, but then I crosspost them via RSS, I should probably make sure I have a copyright statement in the feed, too(?) I do allow some selected image usage licensed under creative commons for some of my work at flickr (images which do not live in my image gallery). Sigh, it’s all very complicated.

On the other hand (and in another mailbox), I received a link to the nifty copyright slider, i.e., a online tool to check the potential copyright clearance needed…and really, if you are still confused about creative commons, may I suggest this (again):


Internet archive and creative commons

April 3, 2008

An article I wrote for moonshine…
—————————-
Did you know that the Internet Archive not only archives the web but that it has much opensource, public domain or creative commons licensed material? For those of you who do digital work, the Internet Archive may be the best kept secret on the web!

If you do any kind of digital work (images, websites, videos, audio recordings, etc.) and you haven’t checked out the Internet Archive you really should. The IA has great stuff for digital collagists, movie makers, & other arty folks. It’s remarkable the diversity and variety of material available for use (and free!).

Although I’m not a legal expert by any means, I’ll attempt to explain my understanding of the different licensing under creative commons and how it applies to use. If you have any questions or to find the latest version of licensing agreements, please do check out the Creative Commons website.

Creative Commons is a form of licensing which easily allows users (such as musicians, artists, and just regular folks!) the ability to upload content and share or not share it, as they would like. Copyright ranges from All rights reserved (no use by others) to Public Domain (freely used for any purpose). Creative Commons attempts to define the grey area in the middle.

Internet Archives serves as a repository of content. Explore, enjoy, be inspired, and create!

————–

In the Internet Archive:

To Browse by license, pattern your search phrase this way> /metadata/licenseurl:http*abbreviation/*

To add a search keyword to this (add AND – in caps! – and the term
/metadata/licenseurl:http*abbreviation/* AND

Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives (by-nc-nd) : This license means that you can only use the material noncommercially EXACTLY as it is (no collage work, no mashups, etc.) , provided that you provide an attribution (credit).

In the search box: /metadata/licenseurl:http*by-nc-nd/*
Example:
/metadata/licenseurl:http*by-nc-nd/* AND pottery

Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike (by-nc-sa) : This license means that you can ONLY use the material noncommercially IF any creation that stems from the work under this licensed is publicly shared (Share Alike) under the same license, PROVIDED that you provide an attribution (credit).

In the search box: /metadata/licenseurl:http*by-nc-sa/*

Example:
/metadata/licenseurl:http*by-nc-sa/* AND pottery

Attribution Non-commercial (by-nc) : This license means that you can ONLY use the material noncommercially, PROVIDED that you provide an attribution (credit).

In the search box: /metadata/licenseurl:http*by-nc*

Example:
/metadata/licenseurl:http*by-nc* AND pottery

Attribution Share Alike (by-sa) : This license means that you can use the material commercially or noncommercially IF any creation that stems from the work under this licensed is publicly shared (Share Alike) under the same license, PROVIDED that you provide an attribution (credit).

In the search box: /metadata/licenseurl:http*by-sa*

Example:
/metadata/licenseurl:http*by* AND pottery

Attribution (by) : This license means that you can use the material commercially or noncommercially, PROVIDED that you provide an attribution (credit).

In the search box: /metadata/licenseurl:http*by*

Example:
/metadata/licenseurl:http*by* AND pottery

More about creative commons licensing:

  • http://creativecommons.org/about/license/
  • The Internet Archive also includes items in the Public Domain. These are the most freely available materials in terms of licensing (i.e., there is none!) The majority of these materials are older materials for which copyright has long expired. However, users can choose to submit their works to the IA as public domain.

    /metadata/licenseurl:http*publicdomain*
    Example:
    /metadata/licenseurl:http*publicdomain* AND pottery

    Republished from moonshine arts magazine