Various links: academia online, sustainability of digital projects, LC and Cloud storage, web tools & more

July 20, 2009


Link roundup… Lots to read and consider and ponder….

Very cool…Thousands of video lectures from the world’s top scholars.
http://academicearth.org/

a multi-year, international exploration of the strategies being used to support digital initiatives over the long term.
http://www.ithaka.org/ithaka-s-r/strategy/ithaka-case-studies-in-sustainability

Social networking site for researchers aims to make academic papers a thing of the past
http://www.physorg.com/news166943362.html

LC tests cloud storage
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13846_3-10286280-62.html

Yahoo pipes… if you haven’t played, you should!
http://pipes.yahoo.com/pipes/

Data rot. sigh.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/03/01/sunday/main4836569.shtml

Google to launch operating system to compete with Windows
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/8139711.stm
Yay? I don’t know — both are still commercial companies.

An unofficial Q and A about the Discontinuation of the XHTML2 WG
http://hsivonen.iki.fi/xhtml2-html5-q-and-a/

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Online org chart creator

August 27, 2008

Cogmap is an online organization/project group chart creator.
http://www.cogmap.com/

Someone has created one for microsoft, too.
http://www.cogmap.com/chart/microsoft

Kind of an interesting idea!


oh.. ouch… ajax slammed

September 10, 2007

The Web and AJAX have many deficiencies, including security holes, and much more needs to be done to iron out these problems, according to a keynote speaker at The Rich Web Experience conference in San Jose, Calif., on Thursday evening

After taking the audience through a history of computing interfaces beginning with Hollerith cards to time-sharing and finally to the Web, Douglas Crockford, an architect at Yahoo and creator of JSON (JavaScript Object Notation), gave a mostly gloomy presentation on AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) and the Web. His presentation was entitled, “The State of AJAX.”

“The sad thing was the Web was a step backward in terms of interactivity [when it debuted],” Crockford said.

more here

—-

really, the web was not as interactive, as say, real life? Oh, that is funny! In spite of that silly statement, an interesting article with an overview of most of the major programming languages used in web development (as well as their flaws!). Perhaps, a little jealousy that yahoo wasn’t more on top of the web 2.0 trend? I finally gave up on the automigration of my photos from yahoo to flickr, and just did it myself…


Mini presentation on Web 2.0 technologies

August 21, 2007

Overview

 

 

  • Looking to the future

    • Higher profile web presence

    • Being where our users are

      • Facebook

      • Comments in blog

      • PennTags – tagging by users in the catalog

      • Flickr?


    • Web 3.0/Semantic Web


A quick intro to social bookmarking

Social bookmarking is an activity performed over a computer network that allows users to save and categorize (see folksonomy) a personal collection of bookmarks and share them with others. Users may also take bookmarks saved by others and add them to their own collection, as well as to subscribe to the lists of others. – a personal knowledge management tool …

The concept of shared online bookmarks dates back to April 1996 with the launch of itList.com. Within the next three years online bookmark services became competitive, with venture-backed companies like Backflip, Blink,Clip2, Hotlinks, Quiver, and others entering the market. Lacking viable models for making money, most of this early generation of social bookmarking companies failed as the dot-com bubble burst.
— Wikipedia, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_bookmarking, (2007)

The main features of any social bookmarking tool are

  • centralized storage and availability of web links (i.e., accessible from most any computer with internet connection)

  • the ability to organize web links in some way (tagging, categorizing, bundling, descriptions, etc.)

  • ease of use (little or no coding experience needed)

  • discovery (e.g., the ability to share, recommend, or discover web links from other users)


A few popular social bookmarking tools include:

CiteULike (http://www.citeulike.org/ ) saves citation details, exports them in a few different formats, and aggregates journal articles. Sometimes called the “del.icio.us for the academic world”.

 


del.icio.us (
http://del.icio.us ) is a social bookmarking tool that allows users to save, recommend, and share bookmarks through networks. Users can bundle (categorize) web links as well as assign tags (keywords). Links can be publicly shared or private. A GIL record can be tagged in del.icio.us.


Digg (
http://digg.com/) is similar to both del.icio.us and pageflakes in that it is social bookmarking. Digg provides categories as a controlled entry point and allows users to rate articles.


furl
(http://furl.net) is a social bookmarking site website that allows users to store searchable copies of websites; additionally users can share their website copies.

PennTags (http://tags.library.upenn.edu /) is social bookmarking for the University of Pennsylvania’s catalog. An example of a record tagged in PennTags catalog (a Voyager catalog!)

Pines/Evergreen is anticipating tagging as a Fall 2007 enhancement; OCLC’s Worldcat.org also has social bookmarking on their list of future enhancements.

StumbleUpon (http://www.stumbleupon.com/ ) is a toolbar feature which allows for user recommendations and metadata entry (descriptions, etc.), and random discovery.

..and expanding beyond bookmarking…

Nines (http://www.nines.org/index.html ) uses Collex “a collections and exhibits tool for the remixable web, to aggregate peer-reviewed online scholarship and allow you to collect, annotate, and share it with students and colleagues” and have partnered with libraries such as University of Virginia.


Pageflakes (http://www.pageflakes.com/) is an ajax driven site that allows a user to pull in and share multiple kinds of rss feeds and web sites including del.icio.us links, news sites, blogs, and more. pageflakes is actively developing its service to give users more features and greater functionality without sacrificing ease of use. To see a pageflake pulling in UGA’s library content: http://www.pageflakes.com/georgiawebgurl/

Netvibe (
http://www.netvibes.com ) is an ajax driven site that allows a user to pull in and share multiple kinds of rss feeds including del.icio.us links, news sites, blogs, and more. netvibes was a little earlier than pageflakes in development.

LibraryThing (http://www.librarything.com ) is a organizational service for materials such as personal libraries which provides means to organize, share, and discover resources. LibraryThing has recently developed widgets for use by libraries. Two academic libraries are testing.

SmartTech (http://smartech.gatech.edu /): Georgia Tech’s institutional repository which includes user submitted content.


…and other social networking sites which are offer more expanded services


Academic Libraries using Social Bookmarking:


Griffin Tech
http://del.icio.us/griffintechlibrary/

University of Michigan

http://www.lib.umich.edu/usability/resources.html


University of Tennessee
http://www.lib.utc.edu/interesting-websites.html

University of Georgia Cataloging Department

http://www.libs.uga.edu/catalog/links.html


Savannah Technical College
http://del.icio.us/savannahtech

..and there’s even a Library community devoted to academic libraries using web 2.0 technologies:
http://library20.ning.com/group/academiclibariesandlibrary20web20

A few resources about social bookmarking/networking and other web 2.0 tools:

31 things to do with flickr in a library

http://www.webjunction.org/do/DisplayContent?id=17624

 

The Academic Library 2.0 (a graphic)

http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=222280353&size=o

 

Academic libraries who are blogging (a list)

http://www.blogwithoutalibrary.net/links/index.php?title=Academic_libraries

 

Chief Thingamabrian [LibraryThing overview]

http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6403633.html

 

 

Five weeks to a Social Library [resources and courses]

http://www.sociallibraries.com/course/

 

Friends: Social Networking Sites for Engaged Library Services

http://onlinesocialnetworks.blogspot.com/

 

Library Thing: Sneak Peek LibraryThing for libraries

http://www.librarything.com/thingology/2007/04/sneak-peek-librarything-for-libraries_09.php


Social Bookmarking Tools 1: General Reviews
D-Lib Magazine, April 2005, Vol. 11 No.4
http://www.dlib.org/dlib/april05/hammond/04hammond.html


Tagging in the Medical Library

http://tunaiskewl.wordpress.com/2007/07/08/tagging-in-the-medical-library/

 

Why and how to use blogging to promote your library’s services

Infotoday, Nov/Dec 2003, Vol. 17 No. 6

http://www.infotoday.com/MLS/nov03/fichter.shtml

 


Learn more about social networking tools via video:


The machine is us/ing Us (Very good and very short introduction to what is web 2.0)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gmP4nk0EOE

 

RSS Feeds in Plain English

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0klgLsSxGsU

 

Wikis in Plain English

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dnL00TdmLY

 

Using del.icio.us

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1pOsYjCvE8

 

To the future:

Web 3.0/semantic web

The semantic web is an evolving extension of the World Wide Web in which web content can be expressed not only in natural language, but also in a format that can be read and used by software agents, thus permitting them to find, share and integrate information more easily.[1] It derives from W3C director Sir Tim Berners-Lee‘s vision of the Web as a universal medium for data, information, and knowledge exchange. At its core, the semantic web comprises a philosophy,[2] a set of design principles,[3] collaborative working groups, and a variety of enabling technologies.

–Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_web

So, if Web2.0 is about collaboration, ease of use (on the user side) then Web 3.0 is about taking information and the efforts of the Web 2.0 collaboration and using technology to extend possibilities.

Semantic web technologies(?)

Freebase (http://www.freebase.org ) is a collaborative site (i.e., social networking) which also uses metadata to assist in organizing content.

Mashups?

A Mashup is a web application which pulls together information using a variety of resources to produce a singular thing (movie, webpage, etc.).

more

Getting started with del.icio.us

http://del.icio.us/help/

delicious page for links in this presentation

http://del.icio.us/webtechnologiespresentation

Image by sirexkat (Kathryn Greene) licensed under creative commons attribution 2.0 (flickr)

Thanks to Melissa Rethlefsen (Learning Resource Center) Mayo Clinic for sharing her list of library del.icio.us links.


Mini presentation on Web 2.0 technologies

August 21, 2007

Overview

  • Looking to the future

    • Higher profile web presence

    • Being where our users are

      • Facebook

      • Comments in blog

      • PennTags – tagging by users in the catalog

      • Flickr?


    • Web 3.0/Semantic Web


A quick intro to social bookmarking

Social bookmarking is an activity performed over a computer network that allows users to save and categorize (see folksonomy) a personal collection of bookmarks and share them with others. Users may also take bookmarks saved by others and add them to their own collection, as well as to subscribe to the lists of others. – a personal knowledge management tool …

The concept of shared online bookmarks dates back to April 1996 with the launch of itList.com. Within the next three years online bookmark services became competitive, with venture-backed companies like Backflip, Blink,Clip2, Hotlinks, Quiver, and others entering the market. Lacking viable models for making money, most of this early generation of social bookmarking companies failed as the dot-com bubble burst.
— Wikipedia, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_bookmarking, (2007)

The main features of any social bookmarking tool are

  • centralized storage and availability of web links (i.e., accessible from most any computer with internet connection)

  • the ability to organize web links in some way (tagging, categorizing, bundling, descriptions, etc.)

  • ease of use (little or no coding experience needed)

  • discovery (e.g., the ability to share, recommend, or discover web links from other users)


A few popular social bookmarking tools include:

CiteULike (http://www.citeulike.org/ ) saves citation details, exports them in a few different formats, and aggregates journal articles. Sometimes called the “del.icio.us for the academic world”.


del.icio.us (
http://del.icio.us ) is a social bookmarking tool that allows users to save, recommend, and share bookmarks through networks. Users can bundle (categorize) web links as well as assign tags (keywords). Links can be publicly shared or private. A GIL record can be tagged in del.icio.us.


Digg (
http://digg.com/) is similar to both del.icio.us and pageflakes in that it is social bookmarking. Digg provides categories as a controlled entry point and allows users to rate articles.


furl
(http://furl.net) is a social bookmarking site website that allows users to store searchable copies of websites; additionally users can share their website copies.

PennTags (http://tags.library.upenn.edu /) is social bookmarking for the University of Pennsylvania’s catalog. An example of a record tagged in PennTags catalog (a Voyager catalog!)

Pines/Evergreen is anticipating tagging as a Fall 2007 enhancement; OCLC’s Worldcat.org also has social bookmarking on their list of future enhancements.

StumbleUpon (http://www.stumbleupon.com/ ) is a toolbar feature which allows for user recommendations and metadata entry (descriptions, etc.), and random discovery.

..and expanding beyond bookmarking…

Nines (http://www.nines.org/index.html ) uses Collex “a collections and exhibits tool for the remixable web, to aggregate peer-reviewed online scholarship and allow you to collect, annotate, and share it with students and colleagues” and have partnered with libraries such as University of Virginia.


Pageflakes (http://www.pageflakes.com/) is an ajax driven site that allows a user to pull in and share multiple kinds of rss feeds and web sites including del.icio.us links, news sites, blogs, and more. pageflakes is actively developing its service to give users more features and greater functionality without sacrificing ease of use. To see a pageflake pulling in UGA’s library content: http://www.pageflakes.com/georgiawebgurl/

Netvibe (
http://www.netvibes.com ) is an ajax driven site that allows a user to pull in and share multiple kinds of rss feeds including del.icio.us links, news sites, blogs, and more. netvibes was a little earlier than pageflakes in development.

LibraryThing (http://www.librarything.com ) is a organizational service for materials such as personal libraries which provides means to organize, share, and discover resources. LibraryThing has recently developed widgets for use by libraries. Two academic libraries are testing.

SmartTech (http://smartech.gatech.edu /): Georgia Tech’s institutional repository which includes user submitted content.


…and other social networking sites which are offer more expanded services


Academic Libraries using Social Bookmarking:


Griffin Tech
http://del.icio.us/griffintechlibrary/

University of Michigan

http://www.lib.umich.edu/usability/resources.html


University of Tennessee
http://www.lib.utc.edu/interesting-websites.html

University of Georgia Cataloging Department

http://www.libs.uga.edu/catalog/links.html


Savannah Technical College
http://del.icio.us/savannahtech

..and there’s even a Library community devoted to academic libraries using web 2.0 technologies:
http://library20.ning.com/group/academiclibariesandlibrary20web20

A few resources about social bookmarking/networking and other web 2.0 tools:

31 things to do with flickr in a library

http://www.webjunction.org/do/DisplayContent?id=17624

The Academic Library 2.0 (a graphic)

http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=222280353&size=o

Academic libraries who are blogging (a list)

http://www.blogwithoutalibrary.net/links/index.php?title=Academic_libraries

Chief Thingamabrian [LibraryThing overview]

http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6403633.html

Five weeks to a Social Library [resources and courses]

http://www.sociallibraries.com/course/

Friends: Social Networking Sites for Engaged Library Services

http://onlinesocialnetworks.blogspot.com/

Library Thing: Sneak Peek LibraryThing for libraries

http://www.librarything.com/thingology/2007/04/sneak-peek-librarything-for-libraries_09.php


Social Bookmarking Tools 1: General Reviews
D-Lib Magazine, April 2005, Vol. 11 No.4
http://www.dlib.org/dlib/april05/hammond/04hammond.html


Tagging in the Medical Library

http://tunaiskewl.wordpress.com/2007/07/08/tagging-in-the-medical-library/

Why and how to use blogging to promote your library’s services

Infotoday, Nov/Dec 2003, Vol. 17 No. 6

http://www.infotoday.com/MLS/nov03/fichter.shtml


Learn more about social networking tools via video:


The machine is us/ing Us (Very good and very short introduction to what is web 2.0)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gmP4nk0EOE

RSS Feeds in Plain English

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0klgLsSxGsU

Wikis in Plain English

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dnL00TdmLY

Using del.icio.us

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1pOsYjCvE8

To the future:

Web 3.0/semantic web

The semantic web is an evolving extension of the World Wide Web in which web content can be expressed not only in natural language, but also in a format that can be read and used by software agents, thus permitting them to find, share and integrate information more easily.[1] It derives from W3C director Sir Tim Berners-Lee‘s vision of the Web as a universal medium for data, information, and knowledge exchange. At its core, the semantic web comprises a philosophy,[2] a set of design principles,[3] collaborative working groups, and a variety of enabling technologies.

–Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_web

So, if Web2.0 is about collaboration, ease of use (on the user side) then Web 3.0 is about taking information and the efforts of the Web 2.0 collaboration and using technology to extend possibilities.

Semantic web technologies(?)

Freebase (http://www.freebase.org ) is a collaborative site (i.e., social networking) which also uses metadata to assist in organizing content.

Mashups?

A Mashup is a web application which pulls together information using a variety of resources to produce a singular thing (movie, webpage, etc.).

more

Getting started with del.icio.us

http://del.icio.us/help/

delicious page for links in this presentation

http://del.icio.us/webtechnologiespresentation

Image by sirexkat (Kathryn Greene) licensed under creative commons attribution 2.0 (flickr)

Thanks to Melissa Rethlefsen (Learning Resource Center) Mayo Clinic for sharing her list of library del.icio.us links.


pageflakes offers new customization — blizzard!

July 19, 2007

Customized home page startup Pageflakes launched a slew of new features this morning under what it is calling its “Blizzard” release.

Among all of the new features, the two that are important to highlight are social networking and customizable themes on pages.

Until today Pageflakes users could create pages for their own use, and/or make public pages called Pagecasts. The content was and continues to be completely up to the user. Now, however, each user also gets a profile page and can add other Pageflakes users as friends. Effectively, Pageflakes is now a social network, and users can connect based on common interests. See a screen shot of my profile page above (click for larger view). Users with common interests are shown on the bottom right.

My page flakes:
http://www.pageflakes.com/georgiawebgurl/

— more at Techcrunch

http://www.techcrunch.com/2007/07/19/pageflakes-blizzard-release-launches/


pageflakes offers new customization — blizzard!

July 19, 2007

Customized home page startup Pageflakes launched a slew of new features this morning under what it is calling its “Blizzard” release.

Among all of the new features, the two that are important to highlight are social networking and customizable themes on pages.

Until today Pageflakes users could create pages for their own use, and/or make public pages called Pagecasts. The content was and continues to be completely up to the user. Now, however, each user also gets a profile page and can add other Pageflakes users as friends. Effectively, Pageflakes is now a social network, and users can connect based on common interests. See a screen shot of my profile page above (click for larger view). Users with common interests are shown on the bottom right.

My page flakes:
http://www.pageflakes.com/georgiawebgurl/

— more at Techcrunch

http://www.techcrunch.com/2007/07/19/pageflakes-blizzard-release-launches/