Posting by email with wordpress and blogger

January 8, 2009

SO, one of the things I love to do is post by email to blogs (call it laziness, if you want!).

POSTING TO BLOGGER VIA EMAIL

Blogger makes this incredibly easy and does most of the work for you.

Under Settings> Email
In the Mail to Blogger Address, choose an email address you would like to use.

You can also chose if you want to publish or keep them as drafts (for review and publication later).

Now to email a post to blogger from your email client:

In the To: type in the complete name of Mailto-Blogger-Address field. Format exactly as it appears, with the periods and including both the login name, what you typed in the box and the blogger.com, e.g., if your login is mrsmithy, and you used blogme in the box, then your would send an email to
mrsmity.blogme@blogger.com

In the subject of your email, type the title of your soon to be published blog post.
In the body of your email type the post. If you use an email program with html capabilities (links, etc.) blogger should be able to post those correctly.

Make sure to remove any signatures, if you do not want to include those in your posts.

Click send.

Voila! Done!

POSTING TO WORDPRESS VIA EMAIL
To post by email to wordpress, you first need an email mailbox for wordpress. If you use your regular email box, everything sent to your mailbox will be posted to your blog — oops!

>Create a new email just for wordpress

..and then follow these instructions from wp. It is not quite as easy as blogger, but still doable.

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wordpress vs. mt (movable type)

July 1, 2008

good overview of wordpress vs. movable type (mt):
http://mashable.com/2007/08/15/movable-type-wordpress/


Posting to multiple blogs using Live Writer (How to)

March 13, 2008

Live Writer is a desktop application from Microsoft that allows the user to easily post to Microsoft Live Spaces, Blogger, wordpress, and other blog software (either hosted or on your own server). The WYSIWYG tool is amazingly easy to setup and use and posting to multiple blogs is a snap.

Learn more about Livewriter here (and download it, too!)

So, here’s my quick how-to:

On the menu>Under Weblog>Add a weblog

A wizard pops up:

Choose “Another Web Service”
(in other words, blogger, wordpress, etc. aren’t listed in the default)
Click Next.

Type in the URL of your blog and password and login.

Click Next.

Now, LiveWriter will attempt to connect with your blog:

If it is unsuccessful, then you may need to change some settings, such as choosing the type of blog account or changing settings based upon your specific blog settings.
Make any changes needed and click Next.

Once LiveWriter is successful, the message Weblog successfully configured pops up, along with a spot to change the name of the blog, and edit other settings.

On the right sidebar menu, is a list of the blogs configured, a list of tools (insert table, etc.). To crosspost to a blog, Under weblog, choose the “new” blog, and then click publish (far left top menu).
(Sorry the image is so small, blogger shrunk it)


Posting to multiple blogs using Live Writer (How to)

March 13, 2008

Live Writer is a desktop application from Microsoft that allows the user to easily post to Microsoft Live Spaces, Blogger, wordpress, and other blog software (either hosted or on your own server). The WYSIWYG tool is amazingly easy to setup and use and posting to multiple blogs is a snap.

Learn more about Livewriter here (and download it, too!)

So, here’s my quick how-to:

On the menu>Under Weblog>Add a weblog

A wizard pops up:

Choose “Another Web Service”
(in other words, blogger, wordpress, etc. aren’t listed in the default)
Click Next.

Type in the URL of your blog and password and login.

Click Next.

Now, LiveWriter will attempt to connect with your blog:

If it is unsuccessful, then you may need to change some settings, such as choosing the type of blog account or changing settings based upon your specific blog settings.
Make any changes needed and click Next.

Once LiveWriter is successful, the message Weblog successfully configured pops up, along with a spot to change the name of the blog, and edit other settings.

On the right sidebar menu, is a list of the blogs configured, a list of tools (insert table, etc.). To crosspost to a blog, Under weblog, choose the “new” blog, and then click publish (far left top menu).
(Sorry the image is so small, blogger shrunk it)


Migrating/exporting from ee

January 11, 2008

I promised the friendly folks over at textpattern that I would write something about exporting entries from expression engine.
This link in the ee wiki MOSTLY covers it. I say mostly, because you’ll need to make some modifications which are not listed but that I am including. Additionally, you will need to be careful to do all of the steps in order, so I’m just going to go step by step. Also, if you have used subcategories, I haven’t found a way to capture that hierarchical structure. So, depending on what kind of software you are importing these into, you may need to tweak your categories. In textpattern for example, all of the categories go to multiple unfiled categories. It’s easy enough to then just update them in textpattern. This will export everything in Movable Type (MT) format.
Figure out your blog’s name before you start. In expression engine>CP Home › Admin › Weblog Administration › Weblog Management
Edit Preferences>Short Name
The short name is the actual name of your blog. Make a note of it, as you will need it later.
STEP 1: Create an export template group
Login to the control panel.
Click on templates.
Click on “Create new template group” button.
NOTE: You must start with a new template group.
Name your template group:
Template Group Name

The name must be a single word with no spaces

(underscores and dashes are allowed)
Type in Export
Duplicate an Existing Template Group?
Choose> Do Not Duplicate a Group
Make the index template in this group your site’s home page?
Whatever you do, DO NOT CHECK THIS box. This will override your template design for your blog.
Click Submit.
Okay, step 1 is finished. We’ve created a template group, but we now need to create the templates. NOTE: Do not skip any steps.
STEP 2: Create the export template for comments
At this point, you should be back at your list of templates. In the left column, under the header, Template Management, you should see a list that includes all of your template groups.
Under Choose Group>Click on Export
In the column to the right of Choose Group, you should see a list. Click on New Template.
Now we will create templates for the comments and the entries. NOTE: Do not skip any steps.

Template Name

The name must be a single word with no spaces

(underscores and dashes are allowed)
Type in Comments
Choose Template type> Webpage

Default Template Data

None – create an empty template

Click Submit.
We are back at the list.
Click on Preferences (in the column to the right of Choose Group, under the Export header)
The ONLY things to change here are
Allow PHP? Y
PHP Parsing? Input
Note: This must be set for this to work!
Click Update.
We are now back to the list of templates.
Okay, now we have to add the code to make this work.
Under Template Name / Edit
To the left of Comments>Click on>View
Copy & paste the code below into the blank area. Note change “yourblog” to the shortname of your blog. Your blog’s name is not what appears in the title bar of the html page. It is what you have listed in Admin › Weblog Administration › Weblog Management > Edit Preferences>Short Name
The short name is the name of your blog.

updated: 8/08:  I think I’ve fixed the wonky wordpress display with the code.

<?php

global $IN;
$IN->QSTR = ‘{embed:the_entry_id}’

?>

{exp:comment:entries weblog=”weblog1″ sort=”asc”}COMMENT:
AUTHOR: {name}
URL: {url}
DATE: {comment_date format=”%m/%d/%Y %h:%i:%s %A”}
{comment}
—–
{/exp:comment:entries}
Click Update and Finished.
STEP 3: Create the export template for index
At this point, you should be back at your list of templates. In the left column, under the header, Template Management, you should see a list that includes all of your template groups.
Under Choose Group>Click on Export
In the column to the right of Choose Group, you should see a list. Click on New Template.
Now we will create templates for the comments and the entries. NOTE: Do not skip any steps.

Template Name

The name must be a single word with no spaces

(underscores and dashes are allowed)
Type in Index
Choose Template type> Webpage

Default Template Data

None – create an empty template

Click Submit.
We are now back to the list of templates.
Okay, now we have to add the code to make this work.
Under Template Name / Edit
To the left of Index>Click on>View
Copy & paste the code below into the blank area. Note change “yourblog” to the shortname of your blog. Your blog’s name is not what appears in the title bar of the html page. It is what you have listed in Admin › Weblog Administration › Weblog Management > Edit Preferences>Short Name
The short name is the name of your blog.
Also note: If you have used the summary instead of the body then you will need to capture that info, too. I am including the summary because at some point, my blog posts switched to being in the summary. I probably did this out of laziness. 😉
Note: This only includes the first 999 blog posts. If you have more blogposts, try changing the number in limit to encompass all posts. If your export file truncates (doesn’t include all posts) then you may need to do this in two batches.
{exp:weblog:entries weblog=”yourblog” limit=”999″ rdf=”off”}
AUTHOR: {author}
TITLE: {title}
STATUS: Publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 2
CONVERT BREAKS: br
{categories}CATEGORY: {category_name}
{/categories}
DATE: {entry_date format=’%m/%d/%Y %h:%i:%s %A’}
—–
BODY:
{body}
—–
EXTENDED BODY:
{extended}
—–
SUMMARY:
{summary}
—–
{embed=”export2/comments” the_entry_id=”{entry_id}”}
——–
{/exp:weblog:entries}
Click Update and Finished.
STEP 4: Test the export!
We are now back to the list of templates. Check to make sure that you are right area.
Under Choose Group> Export
Next to index there are 2 Views listed. To the left is view template (it is under the header: Template Name / Edit. This is not the View you want. Under the header, View, which is to the right of the Template name Index, is a second View. Click on this view
If everything worked well (give it a second or two) , you should see a large kind of garbled looking file with your posts- this means the export is working. We will format it and save it in a minute. If you are having problems at this point, delete your templates and start over.
IF you are still having problems, drop me a line and I’ll see if I can help you.
Now, to format and save it.
Go to View/ View source in Internet Explorer or Firefox (control + u). Save as index.txt
PROBLEMSOLVING:
Templates not working at all: Check your blog name. In expression engine>CP Home › Admin › Weblog Administration › Weblog Management
Edit Preferences>Short Name
The short name is the name of your blog.
Missing info:
Take a look at your formatted export file. If you are missing your posts or comments, now is the time to fix it. You will need to work on the export code to correct these.
Carriage returns/page breaks
If the code doesn’t work, delete the extra spaces and then just do carriage returns.
Diacritics and special characters like & ‘ etc.
You may or may not need to correct these before you migrate into your new system. I opened the text file and corrected them all before I imported my entries into textpattern.
best of luck. Remember this export file is in MT (Movable Type) format. When you import it into a new software, if there is no import for MT then you may need to do some additional work.


textpattern, wordpress, & redesign

January 3, 2008

I’m re-doing one of my domains with textpattern or wordpress. I considered drupal, but to be honest, I want something with a little stronger 3rd party support. There are several features & functionalities missing in drupal which I need. For a site from scratch or one with content generated from within drupal, all is well. For those working with 3rd party apps already, well, it may or may not work (or even be available).

Drupal templating is also notoriously tough to work with, although with the new css zen template, it is easier to give it a look which is not straight out of the box. Drupal sites are generally u-g-l-y, but very functional! 😉

Anyhow, I decided to try something new. I need:

  • a blog – one with categories, subcategories, tagging, css templating, rss, upload images + the ability to import a rather large MT export file
  • image gallery – preferably one that can import from coppermine or gallery with category support, metadata, rss, crossposting of images (assign images to more than 1 category)
  • easy support for 3rd party scripting from flickr, youtube, blogger, other rss, etc.
  • a way to generate 5 or 6 mostly static pages
  • ability to template and design with css; slightly different templates for various sections
  • valid coding would be nice, but I know there are sometimes compromises

On this domain, I have been using expression engine (ee) for years for a blog software. However, I am now ready to dump ee, due to its cost and licensing restrictions. Actually, I started out with greymatter (opensource) then migrated to MT (movable type) and then migrated to ee. So, some of my data has already been through 3 migrations.

I know wordpress can do this. Textpattern seems to be an option too. So, an interesting experiment.


wordpress.com vs. blogger.com

September 23, 2007

So, I’ve been trying to figure out if I want to move to wordpress.com or use wordpress.org on my domain, or do something entirely different (I’m running drupal on my domain). Occasionally, I have considered moving over to wordpress.com as well… I like wordpress. It’s not so much that I hate blogger, it’s ok, but I’ve been wanting to do something with all of my baby* blogs for a long while. Anyhow, back when I created the baby* blogs, blogger didn’t offer labels or categories (well, they still don’t offer true categories). WordPress.com wasn’t available. I used the baby blogs as a primitive form of categories.

The main reason I started using blogger was for an example for a class project journal. I wanted blog software that was free and easy to use in hopes that it would become an acceptible alternative to creating static html pages (yuck!) on the university’s website. There weren’t alot of alternatives then. I continued using blogger because I received a little bit of traffic from blogger (next blog, or searching in blogger), and I thought that was kind of nice. So, is it better to host on a domain or using a public blog software like wordpress.com or blogger?

..but maybe it’s time to rethink my whole blog presence. Neither wordpress.com or blogger is great, both have limits. When I started thinking about moving over to wordpress.com, I was excited about the ideas of true categories (wouldn’t it be nice to collapse all of my baby blogs into categories here?) but the lack of customized CSS is an issue. I do like wordpress and I would support it, but I don’t know… considering I can do all of those things for free if I host it, then it seems silly to pay extra to have it hosted elsewhere.

So, the dilemma. I read this article about blogger vs. wordpress vs. livejournal and I read this one, too. Basically, all of the same stuff. WordPress = categories good, Blogger = customize CSS good.

Here is my list of pros and cons. Here is my site mirrored here and here it is at blogger. Yes, it does not look like my site at blogger (the not able to customize templates, only headers issue). I’d love to hear from others who have used wordpress, blogger, or any other publicly hosted blog software. What were the advantages and disadvantages? Was it truly better to just host on your own domain? How easy (or not easy) is it to export from a public site (wordpress.com) to a domain?

*baby blogs = Not a blog about babies or small children, but a blog that is part of a larger blog. 😉 (just in case you didn’t catch on to that….)